Friday, August 23, 2013

Training as Represented by a Circle


Training as Represented by a Circle

NOTE: This post is from one of our frequent contributors to this blog, "Birdseye59604."

In some organizations training may be viewed as a redundant task since an employee performs with great results the same tasks day in and day out. Or, some organizations may compare training to a long path of a “never ending story”. However, training is neither redundant nor a long and never ending path; Training is Continuous Improvement and a Circle. 


Norwegian Cookie Cake


When a new person is starting in a job the Enterprise has an indoctrination training planned even if one does not exactly know a new employee’s competence level. Based on historical facts, one assumes that a new person is qualified to enter the Circle of Training at the position’s Level of Performance Criteria. 

Training becomes the circles of a “Circle Cookie Cake”, where each circle represents an organizational competence, performance criteria and training-entry level. The wider circles represent levels where more people are working. At the top, the circle is small with only a few selected individuals. 

When there are Management changes an Enterprise is conducting a “for cause” Management Review and a review of change which could affect the established Safety Management System. Should there be a change of Accountable Executive, it’s the top ring of the “Circle Cookie Cake” where training is applied. When there is a change of an established operational process, it is one of the lower rings where training is applied. Training applies to each circle of Performance Criteria. 


Continuous improvement circle analogy is natural

Each circle represents an Enterprise’s planned training for Competence, Effectiveness and Continuous Improvement. 

When a person has completed the circle’s indoctrination training level of training, it becomes a simple task to add SMS&QA training; technical; recurrent; and training for Continuous Improvement.  

Your thoughts.....


BirdsEye59604  







Wednesday, August 21, 2013

What’s Most Important: Results or Process?


What’s Most Important: Results or Process?

Note: A post prompted by an on-line conversation with Quality professionals. 

Just recently, I had the opportunity to pose this question to a group of Quality professionals. I fostered a great discussion and debate that affects ALL companies in providing the best product or service. I share some of the opinions here to help us foster some thinking. I like to begin by giving Dr. Deming’s philosophy of “Process” control. “..control limits allow us measure the process outcomes. These control limits help us identify the causes of variation which we use to continuously improve the process to our target goal.” 

The Process is a series of steps. These steps are controlled by Management to a predictable output.


Of course it was the intent of Statistical Process Control to so improve the Process..that the result would be “Predictable.” Now, it is important to note that a process can be in complete control and consistently produce an undesired output. That is why we must first determine the best target for our result. Controlling the process would then assure that the target is met every time the process is run. Here are some opinions on that. 

“Processes (by definition) produce results. Someone with demonstrably evident knowledge in response to management who established results to be achieved (goals) was "By what method?" "The outcome of management by results is more trouble, not less. What is wrong? Certainly we need good results, but management by results is not the way to get good results. It is action on outcome, as if the outcome came from a special cause. It is important to work on the causes of results – i.e., on the system."  a systems engineer.

"All things work together for Good"
“As a former process engineer, I vote for process since it is built around a specification or requirement and strives for optimal quality and efficiency. The sought after results should be achieved.”  Process engineer

“What is most important depends of your point of view:  From a customers point of view only the result (product or service) counts. I don’t know of any customer who gets a warm feeling from a perfect process. I know of customers coming back or running away from poor products or services.  From QA point of view I know you need your processes to be controlled to get your desired results”  A lead ISO auditor.


In my opinion, the ladder answer really sums up the question. The customer is concerned about the result. The reliable product that meets their expectation or the service that is outstanding to them. How we achieve those results is the direct responsibility of management and their knowledge, skill and ability to control the process to achieve that result. 


Coronado Resort at Disney World Fl. 

NOTE: Statistical Process Control is the most popular workshop at our QA “Tools” symposium coming up at the Coronado Resort at Disney World Florida at the end of September. Linkedin members have a special rate of $999. Go to :  



http://www.dtiatlanta.com/Symposium2013.html to find see the speakers, Agenda and What’s included. 


Tuesday, August 13, 2013

Bird Activity Trending at Airports.


Bird Activity Trending at Airports. 


NOTE: This post is from one of our frequent contributors to this blog, "Birdseye59604."


Fall is the migratory bird season and bird activities are causing airport operational challenges. Without an automated real-time bird activity tracking system, airport operators are relying on submitted bird sighting reports for trending.  Birds are on the runway, in the approach/departure, and anywhere else in the vicinity of the airport. If there is a river near by, the birds may follow the river both upstream and downstream. Birds are hazards. 

There is currently no commonly used technological application for real-time bird activity threats. Airport operators are relying on their own SMS reports submitted by airport staff, pilots or controllers. The bird sighting process may be simplified by counting one bird or a flock of birds as one sighting. 

An airport somewhere had 58 actual birdstrikes over a 3 year period. 60 % of the birdstrikes occurred in August and September.


During this same 3 year period 60% of the birdstrikes happened on Saturday, Sunday and Monday. 





From these two simple graphs, it can be assessed that over a 3 year period 60% of birdstrikes happened between August 1st and September 30th, and between Thursday morning and Monday Evening. 

When the bird-sighting numbers are known an airport operator may apply addition bird-avoidance mitigation during these peak times of bird activities. In business practices there is a common approach to target customers. In SMS, the common approach is still to “target customers”, which is this case are birds. 


In Business: Target the customers and set course of action. In SMS: Target the "Customer" and set course of action. 

Reducing bird-sightings should reduce bird-strikes. In other words; Hazards are mitigated and Incidents reduced. Targeting hazards and set course of action is “Zero Tolerance to Compromise Aviation Safety” 



BirdsEye59604 

Your thoughts.......







Thursday, August 8, 2013

Dr. W. Edwards Deming’s Teachings Live on!


Dr. W. Edwards Deming’s Teachings Live on!

Note: I was compelled to write about my mentor and the privilege to meet one of his colleagues during the rise of the Quality Revolution which he started. 

"The Father of Quality"
Dr. W. Edwards Deming, a household name in Japan, became the prime catalyst behind the incredible success of Japanese industry. In fact, since 1951, the Deming Prize has been the most coveted and prestigious award among Japanese corporations, similar to the Malcolm Baldrige Award for quality in business in the United States. Today, Deming is finally becoming a household name in his own country. The lessons he has to teach American business are more urgent than ever. This blog promulgates Dr. Deming’s philosophy of “Control” in Process for “Continuous Improvement” and Safety. 
Just how different is the Deming Management Method? Compare just a few of the many differences in beliefs between conventional organizations and Deming organizations: 





Dr. Deming during Interview
Despite being considered something of a hero in Japan, he was only just beginning to win widespread recognition in the U.S. at the time of his death.President Reagan awarded the National Medal of Technology to Deming in 1987. He received in 1988 the Distinguished Career in Science award from the National Academy of Sciences. The Emperor of Japan recognized Dr. Deming's contributions by awarding him the Order of the Sacred Treasure, Second Class for meritorious service.


Ms. Diane Ritter 
I am so privileged to have a colleague of Dr. Deming speaking at our Quality Assurance Tools Symposium at Walt Disney World this year. Ms. Ritter worked with Dr. Deming at Nashua Corporation in the hey day of the Japanese Quality culture change to dominate the U.S. car and electronics markets. Ms. Ritter began her career as a statistician working for companies that manufactured pharmaceuticals, copiers and computer. Starting in 1978 she was mentored by Dr. W. Edwards Deming. Dr. Deming urged Ms. Ritter and associate Michael Brassard, to create a book of tools.  GOAL/QPC took on the challenge of writing a book for all levels of workers to learn problem solving tools. That book, The Memory Jogger™, and it’s successor The Memory Jogger II™, went on to sell over 10 million copies worldwide in seven languages. Diane and Michael’s more recent book, Sailing Through Six Sigma: How the Power of People Can Perfect Processes and Drive Down Costs, is being used by colleges, the American Society for Quality, and the United States Navy as one of their Six Sigma course textbooks. I am so privileged to have a colleague of Dr. Deming speaking at our Quality Assurance Tools Symposium at Walt Disney World this year. Ms. Ritter worked with Dr. Deming at Nashua Corporation in the hey day of the Japanese Quality culture change to dominate the U.S. car and electronics markets. 


Lobby of the Walt Disney Coronado Resort

Ms. Ritter began her career as a statistician working for companies that manufactured pharmaceuticals, copiers and computer. Starting in 1978 she was mentored by Dr. W. Edwards Deming. Dr. Deming urged Ms. Ritter and associate Michael Brassard, to create a book of tools.  GOAL/QPC took on the challenge of writing a book for all levels of workers to learn problem solving tools. That book, The Memory Jogger™, and it’s successor The Memory Jogger II™, went on to sell over 10 million copies worldwide in seven languages. Diane and Michael’s more recent book, Sailing Through Six Sigma: How the Power of People Can Perfect Processes and Drive Down Costs, is being used by colleges, the American Society for Quality, and the United States Navy as one of their Six Sigma course textbooks.

Diane has always been on the cutting edge of the quality [r]evolution. From the factory floor to the Board room, she brings her passion for and expertise in, not only process improvement, but also strategic/Hoshin planning and creativity and innovation. Most recently Diane has: mentored a major fast-food leader and introduced the concepts and tools of continuous improvement at two Bakery Year End Conferences; conducted a blended-learning Lean Six Sigma Green Belt program for 10 teams at a major airline where the training and application of that learning to real problems netted the company over $1.1 million in savings; and facilitated the president and direct staff of an X-ray equipment manufacturing company in developing their strategic/Hoshin plan to increase revenues by 25% using quality improvement tools.

I can not emphasis enough how much your organization will profit from listening to her story. I am looking forward to asking her questions about Dr. Deming and his early work. 


Me and the Castle

D.Ritter’s:Presentation Title:
Deming, Quality & Joggers: Finding inspiration and leadership to do the right things right.

Synopsis:
The NBC White Paper in 1980 was a pivotal turning point for the United States, Dr. W. Edwards Deming, GOAL/QPC, and Diane Ritter. In this presentation, Diane will talk about Dr. Deming’s teachings and inspiration that gave purpose to a young entrepreneurial company and led to helping over 10 million people improve their work and their organization.

You need to sign up to come to Walt Disney World Sept 29, 2013. Here’s the information:









Monday, August 5, 2013

After Training, Everyone is Ready To Go... or Are They?

After Training, Everyone is Ready To Go... or Are They?

NOTE: This post is from one of our frequent contributors to this blog, "Birdseye59604."



A Safety Management System,SMS, Enterprise has established policies, objectives and goals. One of the policies is for employees to report hazards, incidents and accidents.  In addition to policies, the Enterprise has an SMS training system in place for requirements of reporting hazards, incidents or accidents. After this training is done, there is a knowledge test distributed and everyone passes. Everyone is now ready to go... or are they?


It does not make it a fact that there are no hazards to report if no hazards are reported. 

How is it possible to know if all hazard required to be reported are reported? In a “just culture” everyone should feel confidence that reporting hazards are vital to safe operation and that management needs these hazards reported for trending of their hazard register. 

When hazards have been mitigated it is expected that they do not reoccur. However, if hazards are not reported and mitigated, someone will be exposed to that hazard several times.  At some point this unattended hazard could become an incident.  

There are several methods to track the ratio of hazards submitted to latent hazards.  As a simplified example I picked the Heinrich pyramided. Herbert William Heinrich was born in 1886 and a safety pioneer from the 1930s. 


The longer time it takes for a hazard to be exposed,
the longer time it takes for the hazard to become an incident.
In his research he found that for every 300 hazard exposed, there are 29 minor injuries and 1 major injury. When applying this simple theory, for each block of 29 minor injures reported to the Enterprise, the hazard must have been exposed 300 times. This is a simple method to begin the tracking ratio of hazards. 






Your thougths.......


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